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Use Early Words for your Morning Pages practice! - Calling Up Justice!

Use Early Words for your Morning Pages practice!

lady writing. early words build the habit

Use Early Words for your Morning Pages Practice!

Morning Pages are a popular writing exercise developed by Julia Cameron in her book “The Artist’s Way.” The practice involves writing three pages of longhand, stream-of-consciousness writing first thing in the morning. With Early Words this can be done through typing or using talk to text. It is believed that this exercise can help clear the mind and get the creative juices flowing.

There are a few key best practices to follow when doing your EarlyWords

Try to write at least 750 words: The specific number of pages or words is not as important as the act of consistently writing every day. 750 words is approximately 3 pages and is a good starting point. The important thing is to find a length that works for you and stick with it.

Write stream-of-consciousness: The point of morning pages is to clear the mind and get ideas flowing. Don’t worry about grammar, spelling, or even staying on topic. Just let the words flow onto the page.

Write first thing in the morning: The idea behind morning pages is to start the day with a clear mind. Writing first thing in the morning allows you to capture your thoughts before they get muddled by the distractions of the day.

Be consistent: The key to making morning pages effective is to do them consistently. Try to write every day, even if you don’t feel like it. Over time, you may find that the act of writing becomes a useful daily ritual.

Morning pages can be a valuable tool for anyone looking to improve their creativity and clear their mind. By following these best practices, you can make the most of this writing exercise and get the most benefit from it. Early Words can be used for free as a tool to engage with this practice and also to connect with a community.

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